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Will Court Sports Betting Decision Weaken Feds’ Fight Against Sanctuary Cities?

The Supreme Court ruling striking down a federal law that prohibits states from allowing betting on sports backs a robust reading of the Constitution’s 10th Amendment, which limits Washington’s power to force policies on the states—and it suggests the feds “can’t require state or local officials to cooperate with federal immigration authorities,” according to the Cato Institute’s Ilya Shapiro.

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supreme court

Will the Roberts Court Defend Online Fake News?

A professor at the University of California Davis School of Law predicts Supreme Court justices will defend the First Amendment principles of free speech against government attempts to curb Internet abuses—even when those abuses involve promoting falsehoods online.

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New Gun Background Check Record on Black Friday

The FBI was flooded Friday with 203,086 background check requests for gun purchases, setting a new single day record. In a related development, The Supreme Court, which has avoided major gun cases for seven years, on Monday declined to hear a challenge backed by the NRA to Maryland’s 2013 ban on assault weapons enacted after the Newtown, Ct school massacre.

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Do Criminal Defendants Have Web Rights?

A Supreme Court ruling in June overruled the conviction of a sex offender for violating his probation after posting on Facebook. But that opens up a new legal minefield over limitations on internet access for anyone convicted of a crime, warns a Washington, DC attorney.

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‘Notorious RBG’ Bites Her Tongue–Most of the Time

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has promised to be “more circumspect” after boldly criticizing Donald Trump during the presidential campaign. She didn’t mention him directly during two recent speeches, but she did suggest that the judicial branch enjoys a better reputation than the executive or legislative branches of the federal government.

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