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courtroom

Defendants Judge the Courts: More Courtesy, Please

When defendants in New York City were asked in a recent survey to evaluate how they were treated in court, some officials called it “coddling.” But the results suggest that court officers could take a few lessons in fostering respect for the law.

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mind

The ‘Double-Edged Sword’ of the Insanity Defense

A Vanderbilt Law School professor says evidence of mental impairment could be a useful tool in a reformed justice system that focused on rehabilitation rather than blame. But, he argues in a recent study, under the current system, neuroscience can be used by both prosecutors and defense, and has only limited value in assessing guilt.

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Double Blind: Preventing Eyewitness Error

About 70 percent of the roughly 350 inmates exonerated by DNA evidence were convicted based in part, or in whole, on eyewitness testimony. A Philadelphia conference explores why witnesses get it wrong so often—and how to fix it.

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