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coronavirus

How to Ensure Safe, Effective Release and Reentry in the Time of Coronavirus

The COVID-19 pandemic has injected a new meaning into the phrase “public safety.” It  requires not just the release of incarcerated individuals, but ensuring their release doesn’t further endanger their health and the health of the communities to which they return, writes a Washington, D.C,-based  attorney who specializes in sentencing and reentry issues.

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juvenile justice

Learning the Lessons of Past Disasters: Don’t Leave Young People Behind

Following Hurricane Katrina, authorities failed to evacuate at-risk youths in the juvenile justice system, leaving them cut off from their families and without food or water. Unless governors and other state officials act quickly, the current pandemic will cause an even graver catastrophe, warns the president of Youth First Initiative.

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coronavirus

After the COVID-19 Release of Prisoners, Who Will Help Them?

Many of the individuals released from prison or jail to prevent the spread of coronavirus could end up in crowded shelters or similar places, where they will be just as vulnerable as they were inside, warns a former inmate. He calls on authorities to provide adequate resources to community organizations that can provide them with counseling and support.

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barbed wire

Can COVID-19 Force Us to Take Criminal Justice Reform Seriously?

Prisoners in Washington State have filed a lawsuit against Gov. Jay Inslee and state corrections chief Steven Sinclair asking for the release of elderly inmates to halt the spread of the coronavirus. This and similar actions elsewhere are adding long-needed momentum to the movement to reduce mass incarceration, writes an inmate.

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courthouse

How COVID-19 Triggered a ‘Sea Change’ in Arizona Courts

As courts across the country grapple with the pandemic, they might take a lesson from Arizona’s Maricopa County, which has dramatically reduced in-person court appearances.  The “temporary” measure is working so well that the courts might decide to keep it after the crisis is over, writes a Scottsdale defense attorney.

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