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prison wire

Why America’s Prisons Need ‘Systemic Change’

On the 10th anniversary of the Second Chance Act, veteran corrections administrator and researcher Stefan LoBuglio says attitudes towards prisoner reentry have undergone a “sea change” since the 1990s. But in an extended chat with TCR, he warns of a retrenchment in programming that threatens the overall functioning of the U.S. corrections system.

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police

Female Cops: Fighting for Respect in a ‘Boys Club’ Culture 

Increasing numbers of females now serve in the senior ranks of US policing, and they are slowly changing law enforcement practices across the country. But there’s still a long way to go before women cops can achieve full equality with their male peers, a University of Illinois professor argues in a new book.

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private prisons

Do Private Prisons Have a Future?

Beyond the ideological debates about prison privatization, privately run corrections facilities are likely to continue to be used by cash-strapped governments. In a new book, Lauren-Brooke Eisen of New York University says it’s time to explore how the private corrections industry can become a partner in reducing recidivism.

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jail

Why Jail is No Place for the Mentally Troubled

For lack of alternatives, thousands of mentally ill individuals are trapped in the justice system. In a conversation with TCR, Alisa Roth, author of “Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness,” says change will only happen when we reexamine our attitudes towards mental illness.

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AIDS protest

How State Laws Criminalize People With HIV

Some 28 states require individuals to disclose HIV status to their sexual partners or face criminal penalties. Author Trevor Hoppe tells TCR that such laws are largely the result of fear and discrimination towards victims of diseases considered socially unacceptable–a punitive approach that he says continues today in the face of public health crises such as the opioid epidemic.

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evelyn nesbit

Sex, Murder and Madness: Lessons From a Gilded Age Trial

The murder of notable New York architect Sanford White by a jealous husband in 1906 thrust young actress and model Evelyn Nesbit into the center of the first so-called “trial of the century.” Simon Baatz, author of a new book about the case, explains why it still matters today.

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gangs

Life in a Rural Gang: Little Future, Less Hope

Big-city gangs may be more violent and newsworthy, but smaller and less violent versions are a worrying presence in many poor, rural communities. University of Arkansas sociologist Timothy Brown tells TCR what he learned while interviewing gang members in a Clarksdale, Ms., jail.

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