Juveniles and Justice: Unfinished Business

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Photo by Steven Depolo via Flickr

2018-2019 John Jay Juvenile Justice Reporting Fellowships

 

Over the past decade, the nation’s policies towards young people involved in the justice system have undergone a profound change. Some 70 pieces of legislation in at least 36 states have enacted major reforms in areas ranging from raising the age of adult jurisdiction to removing youths from adult prisons. The juvenile commitment rate has dropped by half to its lowest level since the federal government began tracking figures in 1997. But the task’s far from over.  How can journalists interpret the policy challenges and changes emanating from state capitals and Washington to inform public debate?

A conference organized by the John Jay Center on Media, Crime and Justice on Oct 4-5, 2018, marking “Juvenile Justice Month,”  brought together 33 journalists with academics, practitioners, policymakers, advocates and  individuals who have directly experienced the juvenile justice system for two days of intensive briefings and discussions with the aim of  providing fact and research-based perspectives that will offer reporters navigational help in covering these issues. Reporters were selected for these special  fellowships based on their proposed projects and stories.  Their work will be published here and in the main pages of The Crime Report over 2018-2019.

This conference represents the fourth in a series of juvenile justice reporting fellowships organized by the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College, and is supported with grants from the Tow Foundation and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The funders played no part in selection of fellows.  

To see the conference agenda, please click here.

Click here for a list of the fellows and speakers.

For more information, visit the Center on Media, Crime and Justice. 

For information on previous juvenile justice symposia, see The Crime Report/Programs.

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DATA RESOURCES & STATS

(prepared by YouthFirst Initiative)

PDF accessible here

download clickable sheet with links here.

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL

HONORING GAULT: Ensuring Access to Counsel in Delinquency Proceedings
National Juvenile Defender Center  (NJDC)
(NJDC) ACCESS DENIED: A National Snapshot of States’ Failure to Protect Children’s Right to Counsel

(Selected) FELLOWS ARTICLES

Ximena Alvarez, et al  KENS5 News

Feb 27, 2019

2,500-Mile Solo Journey of Guatemalan Teen Ends in College

Cary Aspinwall, Dallas Morning News

June 3, 2019

Are Indigent Texas Kids Getting Fair Representation in Court?

Chelsea Deffenbacher, Register-Guard

Jan 7, 2019

Is a Registry for Juvenile Sex Offenders a Form of ‘Child Abuse’?

Tessa Duvall, The Florida Times-Union

Dec 13, 2018

When Kids Kill

Cassi Feldman, The Appeal

Dec 4, 2018

The Kids ‘Left Behind’ By New York’s Raise the Age Law

Michael Fitzgerald, Chronicle of Social Change

Abe Kenmore, Watertown Times, May 24, 2019

No More Cages: A Juvenile Lockup for Raise-the-Age Kids

Jimmy Jenkins, KJZZ

Jan 23, 2019

Private Health Provider Endangered Arizona Inmates: Whistleblower

Abe Kenmore, Chronicle of Social Change

May 24, 2019

No More Cages: A Juvenile Lockup for Raise-the-Age Kids

Massarah Mikati, Houston Chronicle

May 11, 2019

‘I See You’: Poetry, Dance Help Young Texas Detainees Overcome Trauma

Jessica Miller, Salt Lake Tribune

Kids Shackled in Outdated Courthouses,Dec 2, 2018

Grace Toohey, The Advocate

March 3, 2019

Louisiana Braces for ‘Growing Pains’ After Juvenile Justice Reforms

Joshua Vaughn, The Sentinel/The Appeal

Feb 1, 2019

Kids in Cuffs: Can Governments Afford to Put Children in Adult Jails?

Nov 27, 2018

Young, Black and Charged as Adults

Charlotte West, The Appeal

March 19, 2019

Locking Up Juvenile Truants, Runaways Called ‘State-Sanctioned Trauma’