laptop

Why is Internet Gambling a Crime?

Sports bettors in many states risk prosecution even when their wagers are placed on offshore sites—a legacy of anti-gambling laws created during the pre-internet era. A New York attorney writes it’s time to test the validity of those laws, even if it challenges a lucrative source of state revenue.

protest

Prosecutors: Immigration Raids on Courthouses ‘Jeopardize’ Community Safety

Brooklyn, NY DA Eric Gonzalez, Seattle prosecutor Dan Satterberg and former Nassau County (NY) prosecutor Meg Reiss condemn recent ICE courthouse arrests, charging they “infringe the ability of local officials to protect the rights of  victims, witnesses and defendants” and threaten our democracy.

crime scene

The Rise of White Homicide: What Analysts Have Missed

White homicide victims increased by 22 percent between 2014-2016—not too far off the 29 percent increase in black victims. One possible reason: the opioid epidemic. New evidence reveals a spike in drug-related violence reminiscent of the crack cocaine era, says a leading criminologist.

Chicago police

The Simple Way to Prevent False Confessions

If a lawyer were present at all police interrogations–including of children under 15—prosecutors could avoid scandals like the two Chicago men who won new trials this month on the grounds of false confessions, and 15 others exonerated after findings of police misconduct, says a juvenile justice advocate.

jury summons

Has Plea Bargaining Destroyed the Jury Trial?

Juries decide fewer than four percent of criminal cases today—and fewer than one percent of civil cases. The widespread use of plea bargaining, which helps prosecutors clear crowded dockets, is the principal reason—but it raises serious constitutional questions, says a University of Illinois College of Law professor.

photographer

Who Will Cover Tomorrow’s Crime Stories?

When the NYC websites Gothamist and DNAinfo were shuttered this month, it was a blow to local justice reporting. But it’s also a wakeup call to journalism schools and others to find new ways of filling the coverage gap, writes a NY journalism professor.