Constitution Hall

Fix Your ‘Failing’ Public Defense System, ACLU Tells Nevada

A class-action lawsuit charging Nevada with violating its constitutional responsibility to ensure all citizens receive equal treatment before the law is aimed at pushing the state to fix its “utterly failing” public defense system, according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). It’s the eighth such suit launched by the ACLU against states and counties.

reentry

Redemption at the Gym: A Muscular Approach to Prisoner Reentry

A New York City nonprofit launched by an entrepreneur who spent time behind bars is teaching the formerly incarcerated to become personal trainers—and at the same time puncturing stereotypes that have limited employment opportunities for the millions of Americans with criminal records.

Mizell

‘I Don’t Want to Go Back to an Institution’

Virginia’s struggle to reform its juvenile justice system took a big step with the closure of a 127-year-old youth facility. But as the state governor’s race heats up, advocates want the focus to be on alternatives to youth incarceration.

Does the Constitution Protect Stun Guns?

Massachusetts is one of four states that ban civilians from possessing Tasers and stun guns. A U.S. District judge is expected to rule soon on whether the ban violates the Second Amendment.

police

A Call For A New ‘Public Agenda’ on Criminal Justice

Marking the 50th anniversary of a wide-ranging report of a commission named by President Lyndon B. Johnson, some experts call for a 21st-century repeat, focusing on police, prosecutors, and mass incarceration. But some speakers at a Washington symposium worried the new administration’s “tough on crime” approach could limit its impact.

money

Why White-Collar Crime Is a Growth Industry

In a new book, Michigan criminologist Gregg Barak warns that the failure to effectively regulate multinational corporations allows corporate chicanery to flourish on a global scale.

Dean Gillispie

Blind Injustice: How ‘Tunnel Vision’ Convicts the Innocent

Roger Dean Gillispie was found guilty of rape, even though he didn’t match eyewitness descriptions, and the evidence made clear he was nowhere near the scene of the crime. He spent more than 20 years behind bars until the Ohio Supreme Court this year gave him back his freedom. The director of the Ohio Innocence Project, who worked on his case, tells the story.