Sex Trafficking: Can Private Investigators Fill Gaps Left By Police?

In Part Two of our investigation of America’s sex trafficking crisis, TCR finds a burgeoning “niche” industry of private nonprofit groups—many comprised of ex-cops or military operatives—who operate outside law enforcement. One former FBI agent maintains that if such groups didn’t exist, the picture would be a lot grimmer.

car seat

Memory’s Surprising Role in Child Death Trials

Since 1990, at least 146 parents and caretakers have been convicted in hyperthermia deaths after unintentionally leaving their child in a vehicle. Neuroscientists and child safety advocates say these tragedies are the result of a phenomenon known as a “prospective memory” failure—not criminal negligence—and might have been prevented by public education campaigns.

courtroom

Restoring Mental Competency: Who Really Benefits?

Today, states spend hundreds of millions on evaluating and restoring the “mental competency” of individuals to stand trial. But such restoration is a far cry from the comprehensive mental health treatment needed by defendants who many experts say should never have been incarcerated in the first place.

computer

Access Denied: The Digital Crisis in Prisons

As prison law libraries go digital, many inmates are encountering significant barriers to getting the materials they need to pursue their cases. TCR investigates a barrier to justice that has received little attention.

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Sex Trafficking: South Florida’s Youngest Victims

The trafficking of young girls for sex in the U.S. is often overshadowed by the attention paid to the $150 billion international trade. A Crime Report investigation looks at victims and their families in south Florida, now one of the nation’s major human trafficking centers.

Melissa Braham

Do Jail Diversion Programs Really Work?

The ACLU has filed suit in Kansas, alleging that the state has failed to give defendants sufficient opportunity to benefit from diversion programs. But a TCR investigation finds many experts who argue that the effectiveness of such programs depends on how well they are executed.