courtroom

A ‘Holistic’ Approach to Wrongful Convictions

The “piecemeal” approach by state and federal court approach to addressing trial-level errors fails to account for the complex ways that seemingly independent errors interact with one another, writes a professor at the Northeastern University School of Law.

justice

Is Justice Class-Blind?

A forthcoming study by a University of Texas-Austin law professor says conservative jurists have begun to question precedents applying the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to poor Americans.

burglar

Will Police Respond When Your Burglar Alarm Goes Off?

A study by a home security startup argues they may not. The firm, which advertises its own “artificial intelligence” alternative, says a nationwide survey of law enforcement agencies found that in cities with populations of 50,000 or more, police won’t answer alarm alerts from 40 percent of residents.

prison

‘Political Influence’ Key to Increase in Private Prison Population: Report

The number of people housed in private prisons increased five times faster than the total prison population between 2000 and 2016, and detainees in private immigration facilities increased by 442 percent in same period, says the Sentencing Project, predicting that as overall prison populations decline, corrections companies will “seek profit in other areas of criminal justice services and immigration detention.”

drugs

Curbs on Opioid Prescriptions Haven’t Prevented Deaths: Study

The needs of pain sufferers have been “sacrificed” to aggressive policies aimed at curbing the nation’s opioid epidemic, write two medical researchers in a forthcoming study in the Addiction journal. They argue the policies are based on a misreading of experts’ recommendations.