America’s Justice System Needs a ‘Course Correction’: Jeremy Travis

A “once-in-a-half-century movement” to reform criminal justice is underway, says noted scholar and reformer Jeremy Travis. In a conversation with Greg Berman in the latest installment of the At The Crossroads series of interviews for the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, he explains what it will take to make that movement succeed.

Reducing Violence: Why ‘Simple’ Solutions Won’t Work

As we emerge from the pandemic to face a surge in violent crime, evidence-based gun violence prevention programs take on a new urgency, criminologist Caterina Roman tells Greg Berman in the latest installment of the interview series sponsored by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation.

Bill Bratton on Police Reform: ‘Let’s Do It Right This Time’

Few figures have been as transformative in U.S. policing as Bill Bratton. In a wide-ranging conversation with TCR about his new book, the former chief of the Los Angeles and New York police departments offers some hard-won insights from his own career at a time when the very fundamentals of policing are being called into question―and when U.S. cities are facing a post-pandemic rise in violent crime.

unabomber

How the FBI Caught the Unabomber

On the 25th anniversary of the arrest of Ted Kazcynski, who eluded justice during a nearly two-decade string of bombings that terrified the nation, the three FBI agents who led the investigation have written a book with new details of the case. In a conversation with TCR, Donald Noel, one of the agents, draws some lessons for the pursuit of today’s high-tech criminals.

death pernalty

Why the Death Penalty Lingers On in America

Support for capital punishment has declined in the U.S. to its lowest level in 50 years, yet a majority of states retain the practice. In a chat with TCR, Marc Bookman, a former public defender and author of a new book, explores the systemic, political and emotional factors that keep the death penalty alive.

crime scene

Coping With the ‘Crisis of Violence’

The sharp rise in violent crime in New York City and elsewhere has triggered doubts about how far to go in justice reform. But it doesn’t have to be an “either-or” proposition, says Richard Aborn, president of the city’s Citizen Crime Commission. In the latest installment of the “Crossroads” series of interviews sponsored by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, Aborn explains why.

police

Law Stretched Sideways: The Politics of Police Misconduct

What happens when an ex-cop finds himself caught in a tangled web involving allegations of misconduct and political interference? Former federal prosecutor Caleb Mason explores the angles in a new work of fiction whose resemblance to real-life challenges of the justice system, he tells TCR, is not coincidental.

marlon peterson

A Prison Abolitionist’s Plea: We Need a Better Solution for ‘Egregious Harm’

Marlon Peterson emerged from 10 years in prison with a degree and a conviction that incarceration  is an ultimately futile tool of the U.S. justice system. In an interview for the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s “At the Crossroads” series, he tells writer Greg Berman that punishment alone cannot address the traumas at the root of violent criminal behavior.

FOIA Requesters Wait Months, Years for Answers: Report

There’s been a 46 percent increase in Freedom of Information requests that have been pending for 48 months or more since 2019, according to the FOIA Project. Things are not likely to change under Joe Biden’s administration, the Project warned.