wheelchairs

Why Do We Keep Our Aging Prisoners Behind Bars?

We spend an incredible amount of money warehousing older and sicker low-risk people, while not spending what we should on intervention and re-entry resources for young people. A smarter approach to incarceration would do the reverse, write two justice experts.

prison

Not Guilty—But Not Free 

When exonerated individuals finally leave prison, they are often free in name only. For many of them, the struggle to find employment, housing and mental health treatment is the “stuff of nightmares,” writes a former Baltimore public defender.

prison bars

Long View of Ex-Prisoners Finds 83% Recidivism Rate

A vast new study of recidivism by the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics finds that 44 percent of the 400,000 men and women released from state prisons in the U.S. in 2005 were arrested again during their first year of freedom. Sixty-eight percent were arrested within three years, 79 percent within six years, and 83 percent within nine years.

prison wire

Why America’s Prisons Need ‘Systemic Change’

On the 10th anniversary of the Second Chance Act, veteran corrections administrator and researcher Stefan LoBuglio says attitudes towards prisoner reentry have undergone a “sea change” since the 1990s. But in an extended chat with TCR, he warns of a retrenchment in programming that threatens the overall functioning of the U.S. corrections system.

justice

‘Justice Reinvestment’ Holds Its Own Against Trump

Rep. John Culberson (R-TX), chairman of the House committee that oversees Justice Department funding, has proposed increasing a program aimed at reducing state prison populations and recidivism that the Trump administration wanted to kill. The chairman also sought a small reduction in the FBI budget, plus increases for immigration judges and the Trump-supported Project Safe Neighborhoods program.