toilet roll

Billion-Dollar Prison Budget, But Where’s the Toilet Paper?

Women in Arizona’s state prison complex at Perryville claim that chronic shortages of toilet paper force them to use wash rags instead. Authorities deny the allegations, but a state representative blames cost-cutting and a correctional culture that is largely “designed for men.”

‘Never Give Up:’ A Returning Citizen Finds Hope After Prison

Obtaining a steady job has been a struggle for former Syracuse, N.Y. parolee Shallah “Brooklyn” Beal, who was released in 2016 after serving three years for assault. But he discovered that the first, and hardest challenge, is to break down the emotional walls he built in prison—and learn to trust in himself.

MeToo

Do White Men Still Have a Singular Claim to Power in Politics?

In a new podcast, titled “The Dream Was Not Mine,” on The United States of Anxiety, produced by WNYC studios, Amanda Aronczyk and Nancy Solomon explore how midterm elections could be affected by the rise of women pushing back against sexual and domestic abuse in politics and in the White House.

Leann Bertsch

North Dakota Changes the Rules on Solitary

In a response to the growing consensus that the practice of solitary confinement  is cruel and ineffective, North Dakota has reduced the number of infractions that sends prisoners into isolation—and has changed how inmates are treated if they are sent into “administrative segregation.” The reforms came after a visit by Leann Bertsch, the state’s prison chief, to Norway.

opioid

Rural Jails Grapple With Opioid Epidemic’s ‘Revolving Door’

One of the biggest barriers to fighting the spreading opioid epidemic in rural northeast Washington state is the lack of providers authorized to prescribe  drugs for treating opioid dependence. That’s why local jails need support for providing medication-assisted treatment, says a local doctor.

bail

Can ‘Preventive Detention’ Replace Money Bail?

Under a new law that went into effect this month, New Hampshire judges can no longer keep individuals accused of low-level offenses behind bars just because they can’t afford to pay cash bail. But reformers who welcome the “culture shift” also worry about a companion rule allowing those considered public safety threats to be held in “preventive” custody.