Spy Wars in Washington: Fake News, Russia and the Media

Long before the current probe into Russian meddling in US elections, Soviet and US intelligence agents were operating out of the National Press Building in Washington, DC to covertly influence policymaking. Steven Usdin, author of a new book called the “Bureau of Spies,” tells TCR what he discovered in the archives.

police

Female Cops: Fighting for Respect in a ‘Boys Club’ Culture 

Increasing numbers of females now serve in the senior ranks of US policing, and they are slowly changing law enforcement practices across the country. But there’s still a long way to go before women cops can achieve full equality with their male peers, a University of Illinois professor argues in a new book.

jail

Why Jail is No Place for the Mentally Troubled

For lack of alternatives, thousands of mentally ill individuals are trapped in the justice system. In a conversation with TCR, Alisa Roth, author of “Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness,” says change will only happen when we reexamine our attitudes towards mental illness.

AIDS protest

How State Laws Criminalize People With HIV

Some 28 states require individuals to disclose HIV status to their sexual partners or face criminal penalties. Author Trevor Hoppe tells TCR that such laws are largely the result of fear and discrimination towards victims of diseases considered socially unacceptable–a punitive approach that he says continues today in the face of public health crises such as the opioid epidemic.

evelyn nesbit

Sex, Murder and Madness: Lessons From a Gilded Age Trial

The murder of notable New York architect Sanford White by a jealous husband in 1906 thrust young actress and model Evelyn Nesbit into the center of the first so-called “trial of the century.” Simon Baatz, author of a new book about the case, explains why it still matters today.