New Pentagon Data Give Sex Assault Report Totals by Base

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A woman Marine recruit waits to fire an M-16A2 rifle during basic training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot. Photo by Expert Infantry via Flickr

The Defense Department has for the first time released data on the number of reports of sexual assault across all U.S. military installations at home and abroad, by base, the Huffington Post reports.

Looking only at military personnel — not dependents, civilian contractors or others — and using figures from a 2015 Department of Defense report or more recent figures provided by installations themselves — a clearer picture emerges of which bases seem to have more of a problem with sexual assaults, at least as indicated by number of reports.

Of the three-quarters of U.S. bases for which recent population figures of military personnel were available, an average rate for installations in 2016 is 0.56 percent, or almost six reports per 1,000 personnel. The average figure for 2015 was slightly lower at 0.53 percent, or closer to five reports per 1,000.

The Navy led the way among military branches in 2016 with almost six reports per 1,000; and the Marine Corps was lowest, with approximately four per 1,000. (The Air Force and Army weighed in a few points apart, both in the mid-fives per 1,000.) Larger bases did not seem to have greater problems with sexual assault. Of the 20 largest U.S. bases and joint bases by military population, only four were above the U.S. average rate for sexual assaults reported in 2016 — Naval Station Great Lakes (IL); Joint Base San Antonio (TX); Fort Hood (TX); and Naval Station Norfolk (VA). Of the 20 bases with the highest rates in 2016, many were smaller bases and reserve bases located throughout the U.S.

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