White House Says Media Fail to Report Terrorism

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The White House released a list of 78 terrorist attacks “executed or inspired” by the Islamic State group that it claims support President Trump’s assertion that media organizations are deliberately failing to report adequately, says USA Today. “You’ve seen what happened in Paris and Nice. All over Europe it’s happening. It’s gotten to a point where it’s not even being reported,” Trump told military leaders and troops at U.S. Central Command headquarters in Tampa. “And in many cases, the very, very dishonest press doesn’t want to report it. They have their reasons and you understand that.”

Trump did not explain what he meant by “their reasons.” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer subsequently clarified Trump’s remarks by telling reporters that it wasn’t that there was no reporting on terrorist attacks, but that there was insufficient reporting. “Protests will get blown out of the water, and yet an attack or a foiled attack doesn’t necessarily get the same coverage,” Spicer said. The list distributed by the White House included high-profile incidents in Paris, Nice, Orlando, and San Bernardino, Ca. that received widespread media coverage, as well as more obscure incidents in which police officers and security guards were injured but nobody was killed. The 78 domestic and international attacks cited took place between September 2014 and December 2016, although there was no explanation as to what merited inclusion on the list. There was no mention, for example, of terrorist attacks in Israel. “The real point here is that these terrorists attacks are so pervasive at this point that they do not spark the wall-to-wall coverage they once did,” said White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters.

 

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