MI YouTube Child Porn Case Question: Were Children Abused?

Print

Muskegon, Mi., is divided over the case of Evan Emory, 21, a singer and songwriter, who became a household name last month when he edited a video to make it appear that local elementary school children were listening to him sing a song with graphic sexual lyrics, reports the New York Times. He showed the video in a nightclub and posted it on YouTube. Prosecutor Tony Tague charged Emory with manufacturing and distributing child pornography, which carries a penalty of up to 20 years in prison.

Emory's supporters, including the almost 3,000 people who have “liked” a “Free Evan Emory” Facebook page, say the case is a vast overreaction to a prank gone astray, and a threat to free expression.. “I think they're making a very huge deal out of it ,and it's really not that big of a deal,” said Holly Hawkins, 27, a waitress. “None of the kids were harmed in any way.” Legal experts say the case underscores the evolving nature of the law when it comes to defining child pornography in the age of Facebook, YouTube, and sexting. With the rise of technology, said Carissa Hessick of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State, “now we have situations where people are being arrested and charged” in connection with digitally altered images, where no child was abused.

Comments are closed.