Minor Crimes, Major Challenges

Aggressive police enforcement of misdemeanor crimes is a major reason for clogged courts and racial tensions. A research network announced yesterday at John Jay College to study data from seven cities is aimed at helping policymakers and law enforcement authorities explore different approaches.

Crime, Justice, the Media (and Donald Trump)

Urban violence, police shootings, the opioid epidemic, and a tense political campaign dominated criminal justice coverage during 2016. How did the coverage measure up? And what was overlooked? As journalists gathered in NYC for this year’s John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America, TCR published our annual press review.

New Crime Stats Run Counter to Trump’s Dystopian View

Crime is way down in places like San Diego, Rocky Mount, N.C., and Lowell, Mass. Meanwhile, police chiefs hope to show President Trump and his new attorney general that their view of “American carnage” is a distortion of reality.

Police Chiefs to Trump: Cut Crime, Prisons

A national group led by police chiefs and prosecutors has called on President Donald Trump to adopt policies the organization says can reduce both crime and incarceration and also save taxpayer dollars.

Want a Career in Criminal Justice? Study Mental Illness

Students training for criminal justice careers in the U.S. are given little academic preparation that would help them deal with the mental illness of justice-involved populations. A recent study says it’s a serious oversight–and needs to be corrected by universities.

‘Crowdsourcing Murder’: An Ex-Journalist’s Data Project

Thomas Hargrove’s Murder Accountability Project has assembled case details on 638,454 homicides from 1980 through 2014, including 23,219 cases that hadn’t been reported to the FBI. Anyone with statistical analysis software, available free online, can start looking, across jurisdictions, for serial killers.

Corporate Crime in the Age of Trump

The president’s pledge to do a “big number” on Dodd-Frank legislation won’t open the door to more financial chicanery. That door was never closed, says an expert on multinational corporate crime.