Some Best Buy Informants Told FBI About Child Porn

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At a giant Best Buy repair shop in Brooks, Ky., Geek Squad technicians work on computers owned by people across the U.S. to retrieve lost data. Over several years, a handful of those workers have notified the FBI when they see signs of child pornography, earning payments from the agency, the Washington Post reports. The existence of the small cadre of informants within one of the country’s most popular computer repair services was disclosed in the case of a California doctor who is facing federal charges after his hard drive was flagged by a technician.

The doctor’s lawyers found that the FBI had cultivated eight “confidential human sources” in the Geek Squad over a four-year period, with all of them receiving some payment. The case raises issues about privacy and the government use of informants. Do customers who turn over their computer for repair, do they forfeit their expectation of privacy, and their Fourth Amendment protection from unreasonable searches? And if an informant is paid, does it compromise their credibility or effectively convert them into an agent of the government? Best Buy searching a computer is legal — the customer authorized it, and the law does not prohibit private searches. If Best Buy serves as an arm of the government, then a warrant or specific consent is needed. And a federal judge in the child pornography case against Mark Rettenmaier will allow defense attorneys to probe the relationship between Best Buy and the FBI at a hearing in Los Angeles tomorrow.

 

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