In Reforming Jails, Don’t Leave Women Behind

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Photo by Stephanie Ezcurra via Flickr

Photo by Stephanie Ezcurra via Flickr

Women in jail are now the fastest-growing correctional population in the U.S. The number of females held on any given day has grown 14-fold since 1970—from just under 8,000 to almost 110,000 by 2014. Where’s the research and programming that focuses on their needs?
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6 thoughts on “In Reforming Jails, Don’t Leave Women Behind

  1. The notion that there is a lack of research on evidence-based programming for women is simply false and does harm in perpetuating that myth. Please see the March 2016 issue of Criminal Justice and Behavior, which includes a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of gender-responsive, evidence-based programming for justice involved women (Gobeil, Blanchette, & Stewart, 2016). As the Editor of Criminal Justice and Behavior, and a scholar on justice-involved women, I am disappointed that the editors of The Crime Report didn’t fact check this. The VERA Institute report on women in jail is a critical one, but we shouldn’t disseminate it with false ideas about the state of assessment and programming for women.

  2. Thanks so much for your August report on Women in Jails and the recent Crime Report article. As you know, the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women (www.cjinvolvedwomen.org) has been working to expand the awareness of the impact of women’s justice involvement for the past six years. Our partnership with the American Jail Association resulted in an entire issue of Jails Magazine (January/February 2014) devoted to the topic of women in jails as well as 8 jail tip sheets (http://cjinvolvedwomen.org/jail-tip-sheets/) that were mailed to every jail in the country. Our primary mission is to provide practical tools and resources to assist jails and others who work with justice-involved women to become more gender responsive. Let’s keep getting the word out!

  3. Pingback: Older Women Leaving Prison ‘Less Likely to Return to Crime’ | The Crime Report

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