Mandatory Minimum Term In Terror Law A Factor In Oregon Standoff


Anger over a federal mandatory minimum sentence in a terrorism law is a key factor behind the standoff at a federal wildlife facility in Oregon, reports the Washington Post. Dwight and Steven Hammond were sentenced in October to five years in prison for committing arson on federal land in 2001 and 2006. The pair had been sentenced and served time previously, but on appeal a federal judge ruled that their initial sentences had been too short. In the earlier incident, the men, who had leased grazing rights to the land for their cattle, said they had started the fires on their own land to try to prevent the spread of an invasive species of plant, and that the fire had inadvertently burned onto public land. In 2006, the Hammonds allegedly set a “back fire” meant to protect their land after a series of lightning storms had started a fire on the federal property. Prosecutors said that fire then spread onto the federal land.

“We all know the devastating effects that are caused by wildfires. Fires intentionally and illegally set on public lands, even those in a remote area, threaten property and residents and endanger firefighters called to battle the blaze” said Acting U.S. Attorney Billy Williams. “Congress sought to ensure that anyone who maliciously damages United States' property by fire will serve at least 5 years in prison. These sentences are intended to be long enough to deter those like the Hammonds who disregard the law and place fire fighters and others in jeopardy.” The sentence outraged many fellow ranchers and constitutionalist groups in the northwest, who considered the case an overreach of federal regulation and of the federal prosecutors. Most infuriating about the Hammond case, their supporters say, is that the two men were charged under a federal terrorism statute that requires a five-year mandatory minimum sentence for anyone convicted of arson on federal property. “I don't think anybody would argue that arson took place . . . but to sentence this family as terrorists, we think that is absolutely egregious,” said supporter Jeff Roberts. “These are just country folk, they're not terrorists.”

Comments are closed.