Justice Department Delayed Gun-Control Ideas Until After November Election


The U.S. Justice Department drew up recommendations last year to reduce gun violence, but much of the effort was put on hold until after last month's election, the Washington Post reports, following a similar report in the New York Times. In March 2011, after the shooting of then-Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Az.), Attorney General Eric Holder asked officials to research gun-control issues and devise recommendations for improvements.

Christopher Schroeder, then the head of the Office of Legal Policy, worked with the Criminal Division and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives on the recommendations, meeting with police chiefs, gun-control advocates, firearms dealers, and officials who operate the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The National Rifle Association declined to take part. The department did take steps to make background checks for gun purchases “more thorough and complete” by improving the volume and quality of information available to the FBI's background check system. Recommendations tthat would require legislation were put on hold until after the election.

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