Federal Judge Shoots Down a Portion of Chicago’s Gun Ordinance


Chicago’s firearm ordinance took another blow Tuesday when a federal judge ruled that the section banning permits for people convicted of unlawful use of a weapon is vague and unconstitutional, says the Chicago Tribune. The city must now decide whether to appeal the ruling or rewrite the part of its gun ordinance that bars individuals convicted of even misdemeanor offenses from possessing a firearm in their home for self-defense.

The ruling came in a lawsuit filed by Shawn Gowder, who claimed his constitutional right to bear arms was violated when he was denied a firearm permit two years ago because of a misdemeanor conviction for possessing a gun on a public street. The lawsuit, backed by the NRA, is one of at least five cases pending against the city’s gun ordinance, which was passed in 2010 just days after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the city’s 28-year ban on handguns. The decision by U.S. District Judge Samuel Der-Yeghiayan addresses only a part of the ordinance that relates to applicants who have been convicted of unlawful use of a firearm. Federal lawsuits are still seeking to overturn the city’s ban on retail gun stores and to remove restrictions forbidding guns from yards and on front porches.

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