Craigslist “Adult Services” Action May Be Stunt To Influence Public


Craigslist, by shutting off its “adult services” section and slapping a “censored” label in its place, may be engaging in a high-stakes stunt to influence public opinion, some analysts tell the New York Times. The Web site blocked access to the ads as the Labor Day weekend began and suspended a revenue stream that could bring in an estimated $44 million this year.

Using the word “censored” suggests that the increasingly combative company is trying to draw attention to its fight with state attorneys general over sex ads and to issues of free speech on the Internet. The law has been on Craigslist's side. The federal Communications Decency Act protects Web sites against liability for what their users post on the sites. And last year, the efforts of attorneys general were stymied when a federal judge blocked South Carolina's attorney general from prosecuting Craigslist executives for listings that resulted in prostitution arrests. Attorneys general and advocacy groups have continued to pressure the company to remove the “adult services” section. A letter from 17 state attorneys general Aug. 24 demanded that Craigslist close the section, contending that it helped facilitate prostitution and the trafficking of women and children.

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