Probe Finds Bad Apples In Expanded Federal Air Marshal Service


Since 9/11, more than three dozen federal air marshals have been charged with crimes, and hundreds more have been accused of misconduct, reports ProPublica, a non-profit journalism organization. Cases range from drunken driving and domestic violence to aiding a human-trafficking ring and trying to smuggle explosives from Afghanistan. The Federal Air Marshal Service presents the image of an elite undercover force charged with making split-second decisions that could mean the difference between stopping a terrorist and shooting an innocent passenger.

But an investigation shows that 18 air marshals have been charged with felonies. This spring, after U.S. embassies, airlines and foreign police agencies complained about air marshal misconduct overseas, the agency director dispatched supervisors on international missions. Before 9/11, the Air Marshal Service was a nearly forgotten force of 33 agents with a $4.4 million annual budget. Now housed in the Transportation Security Administration, the agency has a $786 million budget and an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 air marshals.


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